U.S. Senate Election Betting Odds, History and Trends

Updated: 270 Politics & Current Affairs

U.S. Senate Election Betting Odds, History and Trends
Steve Madgwick Editor-In-Chief

Editor-In-Chief with 20 years experience covering the betting angles to breaking news stories. Daily slots player, Portsmouth fan and League Snooker Player

US Senate Betting Odds

The race for Senate control in the current 2022 mid-term elections is fairly tight with betting odds preference for the Democrats.

These odds can change at a moment's notice, so please check with your sportsbook as to the current odds on offer for either side.

Which Party Will control the United States Senate following the 2022 Midterm Elections?

Party Moneyline Probability
Democratic -145 59.17%
Republican +102 49.50%

What is Betting on the US Senate Election?

Betting on the US Senate Elections is simply making predictions and wagers on potential outcomes of the various betting markets available for the mid-term elections

4 Popular Senate Elections Betting Markets

One thing you will not be short of is an option to bet on the Mid Term Senate Elections - At my latest count, as well as outright Senate control, you can bet on the individual state results, the number of seats one party or another will win for representatives in the house, and you can even wager on whether more make or female representatives will win elections

Political betting is becoming more and more popular

1. Senate Control

You can predict and wager on the outright result in terms of which party will control the United States Senate following the mid-term elections.

It is just a matter of predicting and selecting one party to gain control

2. Democratic Seats

Here we have the option of various ranges of the number of representatives there will be in the House of Representatives following the Mid term elections. These markets will also include independent that caucus with either side)

3. Most Accurate Senate Forecast

There are plenty of places to find forecasts for the outcomes of the mid-term elections, so in some places, you can wager on which website or publication will have the most accurate predictions.

For instance, one current market is pitching Fivethirtyeight.com against the Economist.com

Publication Moneyline Probability
FiveThirtyEight -140 58.48%
The Conomist -110 52.40%

4. State Senate Races

Here you can wager on the individual results of the states and which representative or party will win the election

Example Market: - Arizona Senate Election Winner Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Mark Kelly Democrat -190 65.5%
Blake Masters Republican +150 40%

How to bet on the US Senate Elections

The process of betting on the US Senate race is as straightforward as betting on a sporting event. 

Betting apps and websites provide a political section in the menu. Once you’ve arrived you can select from a host of events that includes individual U.S. Senate races and overall control of the U.S. Senate by party.   

If you do not have an active online betting account, you’ll need to set one up. You can head over to osportsbooks where you will see a list of bookmakers available in the US, arranged by state.

We have in-depth sportsbook reviews so you can see what other users think of them before deciding, or you can access a list of Sportsbook promos currently available from all US betting sites. 

  • Once you’ve signed up, simply click on the candidate or party you wish to bet on. 

  • This will open up the bet slip, at which point you will see confirmation of the betting odds being offered.

  • Now you choose your stake - most betting sites will show you how much you can expect to have returned if your prediction is correct.

  • If you are satisfied, hit PLACE BET, to confirm your selection, stake, and bet.

  • You will be given a receipt for your bet and it will appear in your open bets in your account details.

  • Then it's just a matter of waiting for the Election Results.

US Senate Election Contenders in 2022

Thirty-four of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate will be determined by election on November 8th. 

Senators are elected to six-year terms, and every two years the members of one class—senators are divided into three election classes—face election or reelection.

Of the 34 races on this year’s docket, FiveThirtyEight and The Economist among others have deemed only nine to be truly competitive. What they mean by competitive is that there is a greater than 10% chance that one of the two candidates actually wins on Election Night. The remaining 25 races are all projected to be landslide victories.

New Hampshire Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Maggie Hassan Democrat -600 85.7%
Donald C Bolduc Republican +600 14.3%

總統府, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Florida Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Val Demings Democrat +600 14.3%
Marco Rubio Republican -600 85.7%

Arizona Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Mark Kelly Democrat -480 82.8%
Blake Masters Republican +375 21.1%

Gage Skidmore from Peoria, AZ, United States of America, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Pennsylvania Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
John Fetterman Democrat -335 77%
Mehmet Oz Republican +300 25%

Ohio Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Tim Ryan Democrat +233 30%
J.D. Vance Republican -300 75%

Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Cheri Beasley Democratic -200 33%
Ted Budd Republican +200 67%

Wisconsin Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Mandela Barnes Democrat -200 33%
Ron Johnson Republican +200 67%

Public Domain Dedication, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Georgia Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Raphael Warnock Democrat -117 54%
Herschel Walker Republican +113 46%

Georgia - Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) were deadlocked in the polls in mid-September, but Warnock has opened up an eight point lead as we enter the final month before Election Day.

Nevada Senate Winner Betting Odds

Candidate Party Moneyline Probability
Catherine Cortez Masto Democrat -130 56.5%
Adam Paul Laxalt Republican +125 44.4%

Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Things to Consider When Betting on the US Senate Election

Keep abreast of the current news, good, bad, or even scandalous. Headlines win and lose votes. Get an early scoop on some negative news for a candidate for a stat and you can be in early betting on the other side before the news becomes widespread and others make the bets cramping the odds on offer.

Historical results can be something to consider when betting on the US senate Elections, although past results are no guarantee for what might happen in the future.

Arguably the best place to find a steer on which way things may go is from polls published by various market research agencies, the press, or political publications online and in print.

History of U.S. Senate Control Since 1999.

You may want to consider some US Senate election history when selecting your wager this time round

106th Congress (1999–2001)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (55 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (45 seats)
  • Total Seats: 100


107th Congress (2001–2003

  • Majority Party (Jan 3–20, 2001): Democrats (50 seats)
  • Minority Party: Republicans (50 seats)
  • Total Seats: 100


  • Majority Party (Jan 20–June 6, 2001): Republicans (50 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (50 seats)
  • Total Seats: 100


  • Majority Party (June 6, 2001–November 12, 2002): Democrats (50 seats)
  • Minority Party: Republicans (49 seats)
  • Other Parties: 1 Independent (caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


  • Majority Party (November 12, 2002–January 3, 2003): Republicans (50 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (48 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2
  • Total Seats: 100


108th Congress (2003–2005)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (51 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Democrats (48 seats)
  • Other Parties: Independent (1 seat) (caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


109th Congress (2005–2007)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (55 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Democrats (44 seats)
  • Other Parties: 1 Independent (caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


110th Congress (2007–2009)

  • Majority Party: Democrats (49 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Republicans (49 seats)
  • Other Parties: 1 Independent; 1 Independent Democrat (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


111th Congress (2009–2011)

  • Majority Party: Democrats (57 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Republicans (41 seats)
  • Other Parties: 1 Independent; 1 Independent Democrat (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


112th Congress (2011–2013)

  • Majority Party: Democrats (51 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Republicans (47 seats)
  • Other Parties: 1 Independent; 1 Independent Democrat (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


113th Congress (2013–2015)

  • Majority Party: Democrats (53 seats)
  • Minority Party:  Republicans (45 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2 Independents (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


114th Congress (2015–2017)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (54 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (44 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2 Independents (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


115th Congress (2017–2019)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (51 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (47 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2 Independents (both caucused with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


116th Congress (2019–2021)

  • Majority Party: Republicans (53 seats)
  • Minority Party: Democrats (45 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2 Independents (both caucus with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


117th Congress (2021–2023)

  • Majority Party: Democrats (48 seats)
  • Minority Party: Republicans (50 seats)
  • Other Parties: 2 Independents (both caucus with the Democrats)
  • Total Seats: 100


Controlling the U.S. Senate provides the majority party with the ability to set the legislative agenda. In many ways, majority control, especially filibuster-proof control, is far more useful than placing a candidate in the White House. 


Neither party has held filibuster-proof power since the 111th Congress when the Democrats enjoyed an 18-seat majority (2 Independents) over their Republican rivals. This coincided with the Democrats controlling the House as well and resulted in the passage of major Democratic initiatives including The Affordable Care Act (ACA). 

Why Are So Many Senators So Old? 

The average age of a sitting U.S. Senator is 64.3 years old. Senators can run for as many terms as they want to during their careers. As a result, there are sitting Senators currently in their 80s. The power of incumbency is also at play here. Since 2000, the reelection rate of sitting U.S. Senators have fluctuated between 79% and 96.2%. 

Another reason why elected officials in the Senate seem to stick around so long is that leadership positions in the U.S. Senate are usually the end of the line in a political career. 

Republican Leadership: Bob Dole is the only Republican in the modern era to have won the party’s nomination for to run for president after serving as a majority or minority leader in the U.S. Senate

Democratic Leadership: You have to go back even further to find an instance of a Democrat in the Senate using a majority or minority leadership role as a stepping stone to the White House. Lyndon Johnson served as the Democratic minority leader from 1953 to 1955 and as their majority leader from 1955-1961 before his time as vice president and president of the United States. 

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